The overall result of these problems was to undermine unionists` confidence in the agreement exploited by the anti-deal DUP, which eventually overtook the pro-deal Unionist Party (UUP) in the 2003 parliamentary elections. The UUP had already resigned from the power-sharing executive in 2002 following the Stormontgate scandal, which implicated three men for gathering intelligence. These charges were eventually dropped in 2005 on the controversial grounds that the persecution was not “in the public interest”. Immediately afterwards, one of the incriminated members of Sinn Féin, Denis Donaldson, was unmasked as a British agent. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Belfast Agreement, better known as the Good Friday Agreement, signed in Northern Ireland on 10 April 1998. [20] The conference takes the form of regular and frequent meetings between the British and Irish ministers in order to promote cooperation between the two governments at all levels. On issues that are not left to Northern Ireland, the Irish Government may present positions and proposals. All decisions of the Conference shall be taken by mutual agreement between the two Governments and the two Governments agree to make determined efforts to resolve disputes between them. The First Page of the Independent on the 1998 Agreement The agreement contains a complex series of provisions relating to a number of areas, including: the agreement reached was that Northern Ireland was part of the United Kingdom and would remain so until a majority of the population, both in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, wanted something else. . .

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