In Scotland, marriage contracts are considered legally binding, provided they are fair and appropriate at the time of interruption. Marriage contracts are now legally enforceable in Britain, your goal should be to make a deal that would determine how you and your partner would divide things fairly. A marriage contract is usually entered into to protect the wealthy spouse, although this may raise questions about fairness for the other spouse, who may not have savings or income to support themselves after the marriage ends. Proving that an agreement has been “freely concluded” can sometimes be a little less easy. As with any legal agreement, there should be no coercion or misal representation. It seems sensible to conclude that, as long as the agreement is not concluded so far before a ceremony, it is obsolete (usually no more than a year), the more “respite” there is between the two events, the better. What to keep in mind for couples with marriage contracts whose marriages have been postponed by the COVID-19 pandemic, especially given the financial impact it has had and will continue to have: a fair and reasonable agreement, accompanied by full disclosure and in-depth advice, may ultimately be rendered ineffective by higher events. Following a review of matrimonial property agreements, the Commission published a report in 2014 recommending the introduction of “qualifying marriage contracts” as enforceable contracts that would allow couples to make binding arrangements for the financial consequences of divorce or dissolution. . . .